West Side corner gets covered by Sterling Smalley

Buffalo Rising’s ‘Man on the Streets’ Sterling Smalley has an audio report on one of the city’s newest attractions found on the West Side. A new parking lot is being ‘built’ at the site that was once Saint Mary’s on the Hill. Upon setting out to find the new unremarkable landmark, Sterling asked neighbors and even an asphalt expert about the change of scenery at the corner of Niagara and Vermont (stated as Rhode Island in the audio due to confusion over where the church once stood – queenseyes will take credit for mistakenly identifying the intersection in the audio script).

Regardless as to which Niagara Street corner now has a new parking lot (there are a few), the West Side finally has enough parking to accommodate its D’Youville students, which was most likely the predetermined outcome for this corner since the start – little pressure on the out of town property owner,  pressing demolition schedules, not attempt at saving any walls or adjoining building (that looked to be intact), no effort to preserve history.

Looking on the bright side, Sterling has come to find out that there are plenty of people in the neighborhood who are happy to see this long overdue parking lot come to fruition. Here’s Sterling’s audio report on this breaking news…

 

About the author  ⁄ queenseyes

Founder of Buffalo Rising. Co-founder Elmwood Avenue Festival of the Arts. Co-founder Powder Keg Festival that built the world's largest ice maze (Guinness Book of World Records). Instigator behind Emerald Beach at the Erie Basin Marina. Co-created Flurrious! winter festival. Co-creator of Rusty Chain Beer. Instigator behind Saturday Artisan Market (SAM) at Canalside. Founder of The Peddler retro and vintage market. Instigator behind Liberty Hound @ Canalside. Catalyst behind the Pierce-Arrow Film Arts Center. Throws The Witches Ball at The Hotel @ The Lafayette. Themed New Years mayhem at various locations. Next up: Porchfest... Also offers package tours of the city for groups or individuals. Contact Newell Nussbaumer | Newell@BuffaloRising.com

13 comments
keetz4
keetz4

 This video needs to go viral all over Buffalo and then the rest of the country.

NBuffGuy
NBuffGuy

It's too late to save the building that once stood on this now vacant lot.  That train has left the station. I don't see anything wrong with allowing students at D'Youville College, whose student body is largely a commuting one, to use the space for parking until someone comes along with an idea for a better use.

biniszkiewicz
biniszkiewicz

A little perspective is in order.

First, the parking lot is occupying a vacant lot. Once upon a time a church stood upon that vacant lot. But it nevertheless is a vacant lot and has been for several years now. Is that lot sacrosanct because upon it this church once sat? This is not a case of building getting demolished for the purpose of creating parking. There are certainly examples of the latter (210 Delaware being demolished for the Jackson/cum Hampton, for example). But this is dirt. The demolition had nothing whatever to do with a desire for parking.

Second, there might be good reason that someone wants to create parking. We ought to insist on better screening of parking lots, so they look better. But there is demand. The Connecticut Street Armory right next door and a push north by D'Youville over the last decade has grown that campus.

Isn't it good that D'Youville has been growing? Isn't it good to attract more residents to this area (parking is tight for residents; freeing some street parking up from students or Connecticut Armory patrons will be welcome.

Is it as nice as a redeveloped church? Nope. I tried to sell that church a few times; had no luck hooking a fish--too much work even a decade before it fell to entice buyers. But the church fell not so that some parking lot could occupy the dirt. The church fell because it was expensive to fix and nobody was able to come up with any plan that made financial sense to save it in its last twenty years of life.

wtupperguy
wtupperguy

So, we're soon to break ground on a Niagara Street overhaul and we start with a new parking lot? I know these projects are unrelated, but seriously, come on. This isn't the neighborhood reinvestment we had in mind.

whateverr
whateverr

Before the out-of-town owner bought it, people who wanted that building to be saved had years to proactively buy it and privately fund its mothballing or rehab (which would've been fine with me if anybody wanted to do that, so maybe I won't qualify for what steel calls the 'demo everything' crowd / guys / gang ).

Someone could've tried to outbid its purchase prices of $17,000 in 2006 or $150,000 in 2010.  Those don't seem impossibly high dollar amounts.

Parking lots are shovel ready if and when somebody wants to build - as we've seen with other parking lots (in EV next to Globe, and Chippewa-Elmwood for part of Uniland's project, and Issa's failed City Tower which would've been on a parking lot Croce now owns if I recall correctly but Issa was able to acquire, and Webster Block's HarborCenter, and so on...)

grad94
grad94

"western new york asphalt coalition."  perfect.

wcperspective
wcperspective

Awesome!  Very Funny!!  Next Assignments: 

Tragic 'loss' of the pedestrian mall needle at Main/Mohawk

Disappointing removeal of the iconic HSBC bowties

Blinding glare off the back of  the new courthouse

micahh64
micahh64

Sterling Smalley -- is he related to Stuart Smalley?


.

David Steele
David Steele

Absolutely perfect. One drawback though - one less shovel ready site and you know how important those are.


wtupperguy
wtupperguy

@David Steele Steel, a completely unrelated topic: On the next street over from where I live, on Cottage Street, there is a mammoth of a house that is very different than the rest. Do you have any info or even know what I'm talking about? It's between Maryland and college. google has it at about 47 cottage street.

You don't have to entertain this question, but, you seem like a good resource. Thank you for any help. This place sparks my curiosity because it seems to be out of place when compared to the surroundings. (in a good way, its beautiful)

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