Kissling Completes Two North Street Renovations

Kissling Interests has nearly completed two large rehabilitation projects on North Street, a beautiful mansion at 249 North Street and the Ambassador apartment building at 175 North Street, both buildings are located in the Allentown Historic District. Since both buildings are contributing structures in the district, they were completed utilizing the Historic Tax Credit program.  

 

249 North Street was originally built as a single family home, but is now converted into multiple apartments all while maintaining the general feeling and characteristics of the original layout. The building is fully rented with the exception of one apartment on the top floor. It features modern finishes and a large rear patio that is shared with the neighboring unit. The views of North Street are fantastic and the lofted bedroom space adds some unique charm with the exposed rafters above.
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8491702715_9aa893442f_b.jpgThe Ambassador building has 115 apartments, all of which have been rehabilitated or nearing the end of construction. There are still many apartments available for rent and options include a studio (325 sq. ft.), 1 bedroom (652 sq. ft.), and a 2 bedroom (848 sq. ft.). The studio apartments range from $625 to $700, the 1 bedrooms go for $825 to $1050, and the 2 bedroom units range from $1100 to $1225 per month. Rent includes gas, heat, water, and garbage. Off-street parking is available for $50 per month, per spot.
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The two rehabbed buildings will go a long way in elevating the profile of North Street and the Allentown neighborhood. Although the mansion at 249 North has been divided, the interior remains largely intact and has retained much of its original charm. One feature to note is the impressive newel post of the grand staircase, which is carved entirely from one piece of wood and intricately detailed. The greatest transformation is the Ambassador, which has been completely updated from top to bottom and is sure to attract a good clientele. Storage units are available in the basement as well as an updated laundry room with television and wireless internet.
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Carmina Wood Morris did the Historic Preservation Certification Applications for 249 North and 175 North.  Tommaso Briatico did design work on 249 North and L2K Design did the interior design work for 175 North.

 

Kissling is planning a full renovation of its brick and terra cotta mansion located next to the Ambassador at 173 North.  Carmina Wood Morris will be doing the tax credit and architectural design work on that new project.

 

For additional photos of both properties, check out my Flickr page here.

 

 
Get Connected: Kissling Interests, 716-853-2787

About the author  ⁄ RaChaCha

16 comments
Pegger
Pegger

Way too expensive for the population that lives in that part of Buffalo. No doubt as to the beautiful sections along North, but there are many other ways to better spend your housing budget to get more bang for your buck.

buffalorr
buffalorr

I used to help maintain this old place back in the 1970's when it was owned by Philip Ransom who lived in the red brick mansion ( 267 North ) now occupied by the Collins Law Firm.

It was filled with colorful young tenant's who were attracted to it because of it's charm and low rent's.

A friendly hippy-type couple living in the lower left hand side apt. with their infant daughter.

An aspiring acting couple occupying the lower right rear unit and a "quite full figured" nurse in the right front who loved food so much that when she moved out, there was at least an inch of grease covering just about the entire kitchen area.

The second floor had a few interns just starting their medical careers, two Dr's and a vet, all three still attending med school.

The attic housed two more apts., one of which housed a gay couple, both upholsterer's in a small shop on Elmwood and the other a musician.

Even the basement had a jerry-rigged type of unit in which several men who's means of support were never really understood, but at $65/ month rent, it didn't seem all that important.

The owner, Mr. Ransom never did credit checks-if he liked you, you were in.

Allentown in those day's really was a bohemian neighborhood in the true sense of the word, largely because this type of housing was available.

I'm thrilled to see this old house has survived over 35 year's since I worked there, I really never thought it would.

The plan for a permanent Mark Twain Museum that was in the works to go in there fell through and then the house was owned by a series of people who either wouldn't or couldn't afford to put any money in the place's upkeep.

Kissling Interests has deep pockets and kudos to them for keeping this and many other historic properties from the wrecking ball.

The only down side to this is that the rents ( $1750 for a one bedroom, $2200 for a two bedroom ) will shut out struggling and creative young people who used to add so much character to the neighborhood.

Allentown for the most part now is either for high income professionals or on the other end of the scale, low income people on government assistance in section 8 housing that many of the larger apt. building's have become.

Progress I know, but much of the charm and unique feel of the neighborhood has faded away.

That's just one opinion from someone who lived there during and toward the end of the hippie-flower child era to which Allentown served as the mecca of in Buffalo.

Mike W
Mike W

Im sorry but I really dislike Kissling. They do a good job on the common areas of the buldings but they lack everything in the unit it self, you can get a way nicer apartment for the same price, look at Rocco's buildings, way nicer and the same price if not cheaper. If you have ever been inside on the the kissling's bulding you will find it to be very dirty, and not kept up, I looked at many in the 800-1200 and was very disapointed. I pay around that for a LOFT with granite and stainless steal. Not to mention kissling owns many bulidings, these are just 2 they redone out of how many? Im sorry but you can get way more for your money in buffalo...

warehousedweller
warehousedweller

hey , i made the wrought iron railing on the front steps of that mansion . oh and i installed it too !

RaChaCha
RaChaCha

I wonder if this will fuel additional upgrading of the large apartment buildings and additional upgrading of the multi-apartment mansion conversions around Elmwood and North--? Such a thing would boost the income density in the vicinity. Perhaps it's time to take a look at upgrading Stuyvesant Plaza.

Sheldon S. Kornpett, D.D.S.
Sheldon S. Kornpett, D.D.S.

It appears to be a cable line. I guess you can now watch TV in your fireplace. The kids are into some pretty wild stuff these days.

EAHS 1972
EAHS 1972

Looks great. One house at a time, one block at a time ... a studio for $750 a month including parking and utilities is a steal!

grad94
grad94

what's that knot or cords in the fireplace?

Lego1981
Lego1981

These are a steal too! In larger cities the rents would be double for these.

paulsobo
paulsobo

Id like to see the Lobby of the LENOX and the Lobby of the LaFayette fully restored to its original. That would be awesome.

On the whole good job. This will be a valuable addition to Buffalo.

I WONDER IF KISSLING WOULD BE WILLING TO TACKLE THE STATLER?

This also makes me wonder if the Liberty should be converted to residential.

Id say that the Liberty, Brisbane, Statler, Hyatt would all make great residential conversions.

(AM&As would be great for residential but they would need to restore the 1890s facade to Main Street and break the buiilding back up into 6 individual buildings.

Jesse
Jesse

"One feature to note is the impressive newel post of the grand staircase, which is carved entirely from one piece of wood and intricately detailed."

You can note it, but you can't (apparently) see a photo of it.

Old First Ward
Old First Ward

No question Buffalo is on a renaissance. If anyone doubts the significance of the availability of Historic Tax Credits as a foundation for the renaissance in restoration, the development and adaptive reuse of these buildings is further proof that tax incentives have helped to rescue the city from blight and misery while saving valuable architecture and housing.

elmdog
elmdog

wow, great looking studio

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