On the Market: The Dun Building

The Dun Building, downtown’s first high rise when it was constructed in 1895, is for sale.  The ten-story, 27,000 sq.ft. building is currently owned by Clover Management and is listed for sale through CBRE Buffalo with a $1.58 million asking price.  It is named for R.G. Dun & Co., a precursor to financial services firm Dun & Bradstreet and was designed by architects E.B. Green and W.S. Wicks.   The Pearl Street building is located within the Joseph Ellicott Historic District and is a designated city landmark.

It was purchased in 1999 by Dun Building LLC, an affiliate of Clover Management.  Each floor contains 2,600 square feet of space, ideal for smaller tenants desiring a full floor of offices. 

Picture 909.jpgThe Dun Building, with its fireproof steel skeleton, led a building boom which was to transform Buffalo in the succeeding ten years.  Preceding the Guaranty and Ellicott Square Buildings in high rise construction by a year, the Dun Building symbolized Buffalo’s progressive attitude and economic might.

Though steel frame technology was new, architects stretched existing styles to fit the new skyscrapers.  Green and Wicks, the dominant local firm of the period, applied the popular renaissance style (with its imperial Roman details) to their first steel frame design.

The verticality of the Dun Building found expression in the four-story-high arches which dominate the façade.  The arches are filled by tripartite windows with metal mullions.  The renaissance style is shown to best advantage, however, in the details, which have an academic exactitude.

These start with the yellow Roman brick of the cladding, long and thin, laid atop a foundation of ashlar masonry.  The courses of brick are regularly interrupted by bands of stone at the 3rd, 6th, 7th and 9th floors.  A dentil band tops the 10th story, and cornice of scrolled modillons caps the building with a flourish.

The entrances are especially rich in details.  The reveals have an elaborate foliate pattern and the surround has talon and bead and reel molding.  The entrances are topped by scrolled cornices supported by ancones and scroll modillions with acanthus leaves.

Above each entrance cornice is a round window surrounded by egg and dart molding and palmette, keystone and foliate carvings.  A frieze with swag carvings and egg and dart molding wraps around the third floor.

Source:  Buffalo’s Best. The Preservation Coalition of Erie County, edited by Tim Tielman. 1985.

Get Connected: CBRE Buffalo, 716.855.3700

DUN_0451.JPGDUN_0461.JPG

About the author  ⁄ jlb716

21 comments
benfranklin
benfranklin

Sorry...probably sick of me on this one...I see Sinatra bought 28,000 square feet on Franklin for 1.29 million, with parking.

benfranklin
benfranklin

I probably wasn't clear enough in my response to buffalofailing. The price is the price, it's not a bargain, or overly expensive.

Doing a little more investigating, fully rented it would generate $300,000. Subtract out all the usual taxes and expenses, plus heat (landlord pays). My point was you need to budget for increased exterior expense, and the support of the elevator, which you normally wouldn't be concerned with in a building that's just 27,000 square feet.

"Realist"
"Realist"

I agree with BF too. His main point of it-can't-be-a-bargain-because-it's-for-sale is nonsense but he sprinkles in words like "economics" and "roi" which appeals to me as an armchair businessman. He's also scolding the hated urbanists, which is a perfectly acceptable substitute for facts and reason in my book.

benfranklin
benfranklin

I agree with your line of reasoning. He has more Buffalo commercial property for sale, specifically the area around Franklin and Allen. Those properties are within a few hundred feet of what will be the new medical school.

Possibly they are focusing on a few other things that are providing a higher return (senior apartments?), or certain tax advantages have been depleted.

I walked around this property today. Can't quite get a handle from a cost standpoint of owning 27,000 square feet that's on two floors vs. 10 floors. Then again, what's the chance of needing to do exterior work? However, you need to repoint 150 feet in the air, that 2700 square foot floor (limited income) makes it impossible to pay for.

buffalofalling
buffalofalling

Bargain huh? Michael Joseph wouldn't be selling this if it were a bargain and moneymaker. The cap rate is lower than other metros, meaning you're better off investing in class B commercial in other regions than Buffalo, which I believe Clover does.

Again, economics people, not architecture. Business people care about ROI, not the cornice or your urban fantasies.

STEEL
STEEL

Would love to see the adjacent parking lot filled in and the cornice reinstalled.

WCPerspective
WCPerspective

Listing said "100 percent occupancy" - Clover website lists two small suites as available. So, "essentially full."

paulsobo
paulsobo

Still there is no reason why it cannot be rebuilt

paulsobo
paulsobo

The incredibly sad thing about the demolition of these old gems with regard to the modern new construction is that they could have constructed these new buildings anywhere in Buffalo.

We could have had our old street grid and our old buildings together with our new buildings if they just decided to build their modern buildings elsewhere.

Losing the Morgan and the Iroquois are huge losses. Terrible.

millertime486
millertime486

Does anyone know what the occupancy of this building is? Is it already full? I think this would make a great apartment and retail complex for Rocco Termini to use as a replacement to the Webb Building. The Webb building was fully rented when converted to a hotel so it would seem as though the demand is there

cyndrome
cyndrome

Each floor would make a fantastic co-op apartment.

elmdog
elmdog

This may be the coolest building in Buffalo and for that price someone might just make it their personal residence....

With the basement floor bar/restaurant and office space and or residential above...i cant imagine this will stay on the market very long....What a great buidling, windows etc....

LouisTully
LouisTully

That link is enough to produce tears with images of the Iroquois and Erie County Savings.

Prospero
Prospero

The 1960's and 70's really sucked for Buffalo architecture.

Jesse
Jesse

It's sad to me that only the very rare modern building will ever achieve a look that rivals these hundred year old master works.

Go to DC and Arlington some time, and tell me if any of the recent crap there will ever hold up over time.

Yeah, ok, maybe you have to pay some actual craftsmen some money to make your building look good, but what the hell. I used to work in Rosslyn and Crystal City and there's nothing there you'd ever remember.

Bland and boring (but cheaper!), that's modern 'architecture'.

grad94
grad94

only 27,000 sf? somehow that figure seems low.

Shoey
Shoey

I hope this doesn't effect Soundlab down in the basement... losing Mohawk and another great venue would be devastating to music fans here in Buffalo.

LouisTully
LouisTully

Marvelous building. This is the type of building you could stare at all day and keep finding fantastic details.

I can only imagine how magnificent it would look as a parking lot.

© 2014 Hyperlocal Media. All Rights Reserved.
phytoceramide pills amazon phytoceramide pills