It takes a public-private partnership.

Pittsburgh is experiencing some of the same urban issues as Buffalo. There are people working and living in downtown Pittsburgh, but the retail climate is still suffering. The City of Pittsburgh has come up with a plan to bring public and private interests together to introduce a strategy to fix the problem. In a recent article in The Atlantic Cities, the plan was laid out. Take three downtown corridors and completely upgrade and urbanize them via a public-private partnership. 
Without a public-private partnership, the plan would probably not work, and ultimately that could be the downfall for an initiative of this type in a city such as Buffalo unless local developers and building owners with deep pockets were interested in the partnership. The respective roles would require The City to update the infrastructure, making the streets and the sidewalks progressive and user-friendly. Create wayfinding signage, dedicated bike lanes, infill, security, crosswalks, public art, lighting, and tree beds with (flowering) trees, etc. Also identify aesthetic fixes for unsightly parking structures and ways to camouflage parking lots. Make sure that the target street has enough retail opportunities to “take hold”. The City’s role in this partnership is “the carrot”. In exchange, the building owners, developers (retail partners if possible) would be on the hook to clean up storefront facades, introduce “pop up” shops, help to create a marketing campaign, and take advantage of matching money grants for additional storefront fixes*.
In essence the plan sees a concentrated effort to revitalize prime corridors. One could say that Buffalo is already doing this by returning cars to Main Street. That is an important project, but The City should start to identify connector corridors that will bridge Main Street to other districts, and the waterfront (not just via Main Street). 
At the same time there are existing commercial districts in Buffalo that could also use some love from The City, such as Allentown. Allen Street desperately needs infrastructure improvements – the street is one big pothole!
You would think that with all of the money that The City is putting into Main Street, that it would try to work with the Main Place Mall in order to get a new facade, or awnings, or anything going with that frontage along the street.
*Some of these ideas were taken from the Pittsburgh initiative and others I added from successful Main Street Programs. Thanks to Lorne Opler for pointing out the article in The Atlantic Cities.
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About the author  ⁄ queenseyes

Founder of Buffalo Rising. Co-founder Elmwood Avenue Festival of the Arts. Co-founder Powder Keg Festival that built the world's largest ice maze (Guinness Book of World Records). Instigator behind Emerald Beach at the Erie Basin Marina. Co-created Flurrious! winter festival. Co-creator of Rusty Chain Beer. Instigator behind Saturday Artisan Market (SAM) at Canalside. Founder of The Peddler retro and vintage market. Instigator behind Liberty Hound @ Canalside. Catalyst behind the Pierce-Arrow Film Arts Center. Throws The Witches Ball at The Hotel @ The Lafayette. Themed New Years mayhem at various locations. Next up: Porchfest... Also offers package tours of the city for groups or individuals. Contact Newell Nussbaumer | Newell@BuffaloRising.com

29 comments
whatever
whatever

Thanks for explaining that, Bill.

At this point in time, would you agree the "This makes a lot of sense in the city." part now doesn't apply and the Common Council should change it?

There's examples of houses or buildings pretty close together in some non-city villages in our burbs, so I wonder how those places certify qualified electricians, plumbers, etc (since there'd be risks there similar to those you mention as motivating the city's rules). Likewise for being allowed to do electrical or plumbing in large buildings in suburban towns - that would create public danger if workers aren't qualified.

So, if those non-rural-but-not-city places don't require being unionized then I'd think there's alternatives which Buffalo's city govt should start allowing too for those types of work here.

However, this part doesn't look entirely true

"no different than saying you want to be a teach in NYS, you can go to whatever school you want but once your picked up, you have to join the ‘guild/union’."

Non-unionized teachers are allowed in some charters & private schools in many places in NYS, even some in Buffalo/city.

TheRealBuffaloBill
TheRealBuffaloBill

Whatever,

The guild controls who is and who is not a master plumber, the guild requires you to operate as a guild member, so your pay chart agreed upon by them, it’s a union of skilled labors setting the price. To even get to take the test you have to serve as an appreciate inside the International Brotherhood of Electrical Workers. So yes all 100 of them on both lists are guild members (unionized together into one work force) who set there price accordingly. ‘Master plumber/electrician/whatever’ forces people into it. It no different than saying you want to be a teach in NYS, you can go to whatever school you want but once your picked up, you have to join the ‘guild/union’. This ends up a problem when you’re paying a guy $75 an hour to run romex/conduit when just about anyone can pull a wire. I’m not going to hook up the power outside, absouellty going to bring in a professional for that, but 90% of the work inside is no problem at all for most people.

The reason these laws were set was whole good originally. If I screw up the wiring and start my building on fire there is a good chance the surrounding buildings could also catch fire, so for the protecting of the people they required people of proven skill back in the day. This makes allot of sense in the city.

The rural areas didn’t have this pressure since if there is several hundred feet, or even thousands between me and my neighbor if I burn my house down, well I’m the only one who’s worse for wear.

synthesis
synthesis

In my opinion from what I see in the news papers and on TV, many politicians and most of the general public have abandoned the Buffalo Magic Silver Bullet Theory. Here, one huge change downtown will turn it all around. Man, that took a really long time to figure out! Now we have to think of even finer details like infrastructure to support retail. Retail that we hope will spawn from critical mass generated by the multiple developments that are slated to be completed between now and 2014 (canalside, medical campus etc.)? Our politician’s heads may explode on this one!

"The respective roles would require The City to update the infrastructure, making the streets and the sidewalks progressive and user-friendly. Create wayfinding signage, dedicated bike lanes, infill, security, crosswalks, public art, lighting, and tree beds with (flowering) trees, etc."

I like these ideas, but it takes public outcry to get things done so lets get to our reps in the legislature and rough them up a little! Or we could write a friendly letter, either way I'm not one to judge.

whatever
whatever

I agree mostly with what you wrote about Cuomo and NYS. He's really continuing the status quo for fiscal matters and costs of doing business. He's made a few semi-serious efforts such as the property tax cap, but even that isn't fully serious because there's loopholes and he's made no effort to seriously reduce spending mandates which those taxes have to pay for. He issued a 10 point agenda last week with no mention of any serious reforms in these kinds of things. Status quo all the way - high taxes, high regulations, and a few corporate welfare style announcements & ribbon cuttings every so often. Just like with Pataki, etc.

But all indications are that he's doing what most NYS voters want. His popularity is high (even though not as high as Byron Brown's - sorry, Mike4Mayor).

So this is just how most people in the state want it to be, evidently. -shrug-

However, I've no idea what you're suggesting about Broadway, Genesee, Sycamore, Walden, Ivy...

Low income people have to live somewhere, and those aren't even in the "center of the city" as you were referring to earlier in your comment.

whatever
whatever

Bill - it could be my ignorance about whether union membership is required by the city code's wording saying a plumber must be licensed as a "master plumber", but I don't see where in the city code text it says a plumber must be unionized.

I don't even see mention of the word union at all about plumbers.

Here's a clickable link to the wording

http://ecode360.com/13624333?highlight=plumbing#13624333

The city govt website's page for listing all licenses contractors does show what looks like at least 100 plumbing firms

http://www.city-buffalo.com/Home/City_Departments/EDPIS/Licenses/LicensedContractors

Is what you're saying that all of 100+ of those must be unionized shops or else Buffalo/City wouldn't license them for commercial work? And same for what looks like over 100 electricians they list?

If that's so, then I'd agree with you that it's a self-inflicted disadvantage the City is creating.

I'd still disagree that NY state should try to make up for that arguably bad decision made by municipalities who choose to do it while others (like examples you mentioned) don't. The latter are in NYS too, so if the state govt leaves it up to each municipality to decide if it wants to require unionization for licenses to do commercial work like plumbing or electrical, then the ones who do that should have to accept consequences.

Still wondering which wording in the city laws requires it?

Is the term "master plumber" a euphemism or dog whistle meaning that nonunion plumbers need not apply for commercial licenses in Buffalo?

Prospero
Prospero

Such a good point! Think of all the people that work down there everyday who want nothing else to do with downtown Buffalo, in terms of entertainment or living, because they're constantly subjected to the trash loitering around. I'm not saying everyone who collects a gov't benefit is scum and an eyesore, but there are some that are and they're usually the most visible.

pfk67
pfk67

Hey, I agree with most of it. But as for human capital, quality individuals attract quality individuals. I think education is never a waste. I also think that education at the high school level is the most important. And for that I will say, garbage in...garbage out. I don't think teaching has anything to do with it. I think the education problem in Buffalo is that the city has essentially kicked out people of any means and invited those without means. What will that get you? Lower social economic status. And what does that get you? More drop outs and fewer kids with any initiative. That is all it is. They can throw the kitchen sink at the problem. If they really want to solve it, they have to attract a higher socioeconomic section of the population. That will actually not just benefit the city schools. But it will benefit all the kids - even the lower socioeconomic ones. A rising tide lifts all boats.

pfk67
pfk67

I agree. Instead of the public as a whole being provided for, this city thinks it needs to aim its dollars at the poor. Don't they realize that the poor benefit by having jobs and opportunity when a city is vibrant? I guess you have to look at where the incentives are being placed. Is it better for you to be a hard worker to get a head in this city or better to be a loafer? My own son says that he doesn't want to be a loafer, yet makes comments that he won't work for less the $10/hr. That is because I made it easy for him to loaf and not get out there and work. I created the incentive to loaf..... He is 22 now and sits at home playing xbox. Well I just kicked him out last week. It is the only way I can free him from a lifetime of misery. I told him I'd buy him a car if he came up with half the money. I'm trying to create the incentives that will make him thrive. We need someone in city hall and Albany to do the same. We need them to create the incentives to make everyone thrive. Not just a few. I know it is a taboo phrase, but "trickle down" does work. That's the way it worked in my family. If my family had a good year and they were successful...I got some good presents at the holidays. If not, very few. In fact, trickle down has another name that people also hate. It's called capitalism.

pfk67
pfk67

Wow, I didn't realize that about plumbing and electrical. I will add my two cents here. Let's look at two cities here. Chicago-it has a policy of keeping the poor out of the city or at least very far from the center of the city. Just go there and see. Low income housing is not walkable. It keeps the city vibrant and welcoming to people with money to invest and vacationers. I'd like to see some people from .... Texas go and stroll Broadway or Genesee or Sycamore... Nobody wants to see that. So we need a city govt that will aim to do the same. As that would be political suicide, only a one termer could possibly pull that off, and he would have to be the energizer bunny. Wealth attracts wealth and poor attracts poor. Who is going to seriously want to buy a house on ...Walden and Ivy for example. Nobody who is going to add money to the city. That is for sure. In fact because we are so accomodating to the poor, the wealth is moving out and the poor are moving in. Sounds like a great plan.

Now lets look at Pittsburg-the reason it is so "successful" with it's turn around is really because it is in a pro-business state. Pennsylvania walks the walk. Taxes are relatively low. In NY you have the governor saying that he has $1 Billion to give away to business. Great. But where did he get that money? We are in the worst state, period. It didn't always have that status, but as other states develop and are competitive, we have become too dominated by liberals trying to achieve utopia for all. The cost of doing business here is too high. That is the problem. Simple as that.

Let's talk about how horrible the rich are. Andrew Carnegie was as rich as anyone today. And what did that jerk do...He gave it all away. Amazing. Go to Pittsburg. He left that city a legacy. How about that jerk Buffet. Oh, he is giving it all away too. Well what about Bill Gates? Hmmm. How is it that the govt thinks it is better at the give away game them individuals?

What the govt doesn't seem to understand is that they don't need to steal from the rich to give to the poor because the rich already give most of it away anyway. Of course, that happened in Buffalo years ago too. We have an Albright Museum, for example. We have Oshei foundations investing in the genesee gateway. What I'm getting at is that the rich (oh sorry) can save this city. Government will only corrupt it. Give those with some money the chance to make a buck and they will invest. Steal it from them in taxes and they will.... invest somewhere else.

RaChaCha
RaChaCha

Your attempt to locate your business in the city might make an interesting story in and of itself. I hope it works out.

Without knowing anything about the type of business this may be the wrong question, but did you look at Connecticut Street--?

TheRealBuffaloBill
TheRealBuffaloBill

Plumbing and Electrical have to be done by union labor inside the city, because the city requires a master plumber to do all work, which is only issued by the Examining Board of Plumbers, which is also the defacto Union body. (See Chapter 326 Plumbing http://ecode360.com/11767340) So I should be clear, they require work that can only be covered by a union worker instead city limits, no just you have to use a union worker. This is also required for electrical, and even a boiler operator if I go over 80HP. I can hire a labor off the street, but those skilled jobs I can’t. As you scale a job the impact of those becomes smaller, but for me 80% of conversation is plumbing/electrical.

In Newstead for example if you do the work yourself, you can just do it. Its a tremendous saving. For building inspections part of it is just mass, in these small area you have 1 guy you deal with for all of them, since the city is huge, you might get 4 guys doing the 4 different inspections.

I take no offense to this, you’re not knowable on the rules (and who would be if you didn’t have to be) and working off circumstantial information.

Buffalo All Star
Buffalo All Star

I would drop the corporate welfare silver bullet syndrome as well..but if theres one thing Buffalo needs large scale its this...PLACE MAKING.

The city of Buffalo does not make an active effort to maintain or enhance any commercial district or infrastructure that has a sense of place. Anyone see the channel 2 newscast on Canalside the other day..looking pretty dumpy..we build these nice things and places..and expect everything to stay magically clean and in pristine condition. Have you heard of preventative maintenance?

A lot of small business owners in the city are not much better either..I've always wondered what the difference was between the sidewalk infront of your house and how clean and well maintained it is versus how the sidwalk infront of your business is pretty much the exact opposite.

Take a walk down Elmwood and Hertel..you'll walk past small businesses who haven't picked up litter, or washed windows, picked up cigarette butts etc..let alone run a power washer on the sidewalk every 6 months. Hertel is looking rough..ignoring the fact that there are more dead sidewalk trees than living (love the yellow one infront of room..wow) I don't think anyone has pulled weeds from the tree beds EVER! Ya know its small things on a large scale that really turn people off, they wonder where their customers have gone off too?

Kudos to Pittsburgh for being proactive. Its a great place that has a few great small districts with pedestrian/street level infrastructure thats supurbly maintained and in Grade A condition.

Buffalo...get your crap together..pick up some trash..lay a fresh coat of paint..fill some pot holes..plant a few trees and flowers and call it a night. The most frusturating part about this city is the lack of care..its amazing sometimes how poorly maintained everything is..public or private.

whatever
whatever

Bill - thanks for elaborating, but it raises more questions & doubts.

You keep referring to the city having "union laws" that would affect you as a business owner which aren't imposed by Wheatfield, etc.

(let's set aside Montana for now if we're comparing within NYS)

I've never heard that before. What are you talking about? Are you claiming the City of Buffalo requires you use union labor on private sector work in ways you wouldn't have to outside of the city in inner or outer suburbs?

RealBuffBill>"...I keep looking for a location in the city but everything is pointing too, Wheatfield, Royalton, Newstead. New buildings, streamline government, same utilities available, easier access to materials, there aren’t union laws for plumbing, electrical etc. Money from the city/state is acting as compensation for all the other stuff a business has to wade through to be in the city.

... NYS is not going to have the business environment of Montana anytime soon. NYS isn’t going to be a right to work state, the city isn’t going to drop the union laws for skilled labor, and our physical environment is old. ..."

If that's really true, I'd wonder why it isn't better known and more talked about. Which city department or permit requires you to hire unionized for anything? Are you sure?

Many non-unionized contractors do projects in the city. The fairly recent multi-story building on Delaware near WGRZ for instance. Also I'm pretty sure Paladino's waterfront condos. I'd bet most if not all projects Paladino does in the city aren't unionized. Maybe most projects that most businesses do in the city aren't either.

Rocco Termini's project on the Lafayette had picketers complaining he wasn't using union labor on it. ...

No offense, but for now I'm very skeptical of your claim.

SecedefromNYS
SecedefromNYS

we cant come up with new ideas??? bad politics... 50 years od recession and people leaving... Need new business to start having rebirth in BFLO.

TheRealBuffaloBill
TheRealBuffaloBill

Last night I took a stroll though a small market district, and every store front was a small store or restaurant. If just one of them was there no one would go, you need mass. So the ‘micro’ loans create the mass, which in turn create the demand for the space, residential etc. Silver Bullet projects don’t work, but everything I can see points to machine gun grants as a better bet, you spread your risk out.

Business and people are leaving, as we have seen a 50% drop in the city in the last 50 years. So they are leaving but its piecemeal so it not horrible obvious. In my own case, what is happening is as I keep looking for a location in the city but everything is pointing too, Wheatfield, Royalton, Newstead. New buildings, streamline government, same utilities available, easier access to materials, there aren’t union laws for plumbing, electrical etc. Money from the city/state is acting as compensation for all the other stuff a business has to wade through to be in the city. The benefit form being right in the city, is some fuel savings, and being part of the city. Which is worth something, but you can’t bank on goodwill overcoming your ledger. It would take me a half a decade to recoup those expensive. The biggest one however is if I invest 250k or so into Broadway, and no one else follows suit, I end up with a building I put 250k into that’s worth 50k and no bank will mortgage.

Again with people its really easy for them to pack up and leave, and the point of NYS government should be the improvement of NYS, if the Feds are doling out the money, well it’s the country. So investing in people is going to be a bad ROI. With ‘small’ loans to small business, that they can only use on capital expenses, you’re not going to lose that stuff in the city easily. A remolded store is going to be stuck there, kitchen equipment, printing equipment, repairing a roof, etc. That stays in the city and even if your first business you loaned to failed, someone can come behind them and fall in on that money already spent. The roof will still be fixed, the kitchen will still be up to current code etc.

I agree if you could make it political level, but that’s just not realistic here. NYS is not going to have the business environment of Montana anytime soon. NYS isn’t going to be a right to work state, the city isn’t going to drop the union laws for skilled labor, and our physical environment is old.

The whole point is capital investment in small business in targeted areas is the key. Part of main st revitalization should be a grant connected to every store front.

BuffaloQPublic
BuffaloQPublic

Re: "You would think that with all of the money that The City is putting into Main Street, that it would try to work with the Main Place Mall in order to get a new facade, or awnings, or anything going with that frontage along the street."

Perhaps a plane flying over City Hall sky-writing that message might get through to them. On the other hand, a simple walk-by the Mall would make the necessity acutely obvious.

whatever
whatever

I don't know how this relates to Pittsburgh, but for a few reasons this from RealBuffaloBill don't look true

"...there would be just about no business in Buffalo at all, everyone would move to right to work states, or overseas..."

Just about no business in Buffalo? Really?

By far most businesses _don't_ receive econ dev aid from NYS or IDAs or the city, do they? Only a relative few do, right? Yet the others are still here.

Some recipients of Empire Zone handouts (Paladino, Termini, and others) made the same arguments you're making back when Gov Paterson was smartly ending that corp welfare.

The number of business who were receiving EZ aid was reported at the time, and it was fewer than 2% or so. The other 98% weren't given it - yet they didn't move to other states or overseas, but had to pay through taxes for the few to get it.

Even of those who do receive it, how many would really move if they didn't receive it? It's far fetched to think Rich's would spend to relocate their HQ if they didn't receive their recent $5M handout. And for some businesses who receive it, their customers would spend here anyway even if the businesses did leave. (restaurants, retail, residential, etc.)

Even in rare cases of businesses who really wouldn't be here if not for corp welfare and whose economic activity wouldn't happen here otherwise - it's just too costly for everyone else to have to pay for them to be here. Often the amounts are in hundreds of thousands per job.

Better to instead use that $ for public purposes and try to keep the playing field level with all business having as as low burdens as can be politically feasible here.

The number you mention is smaller than most - $150k for 4 f/t jobs + 2 p/t.

But is that $150k really the difference maker? Did you drop your plan for that business because the city wouldn't give you $150k? Or are you really moving it to another state? (I don't mean to pry, just wondering.)

To your point about education resulting in people moving away - well, that's their choice of moving or staying. Govt spending is supposed to help people, isn't it? So if it helps some by providing choices in life beyond their home towns, that's how it goes. People educated in other places move to here sometimes too. The education spending should be judged on its own merits.

Comparing to $350k house rehabs is a red herring because most of that $ is federal from HUD. It can't be redirected for state or local corp welfare. Even if it could - that still wouldn't mean that would be the best alternative use.

TheRealBuffaloBill
TheRealBuffaloBill

The thing your completely missing is that if that is the case there would be just about no business in Buffalo at all, everyone would move to right to work states, or overseas right? The barrier that economic development overcomes is the issues that a business cannot deal with, aged infrastructure, weather, physical location.

Human capital is a waste, since those people can just leave to where the business are operating. How many kids with teaching degrees are pumped out from Buff State and Canisius inside the city? I can physically lock in a business and create density, spawning more business with people you can’t. The only exception I can think of is the homestead back which isn’t particularly effective, and is in effective still for business, mortgages and the city real estate department. Yet we have a city school system that is junk, the good ones leave.

Spending money to teach people how to get better jobs else is not going to get us anything but a dwindling tax base. So you opinion, not fact, is wrong and goes against ‘basic economic principles’ that people move to where work is.

Buffalogni
Buffalogni

You are right. These are hard truths but you are right. I do see a difference with infrastructure though. The city needs to maintain the city's hard infrastructure. We need regressive leaders to bring the infrastructure to the levels of quality we used to have in Buffalo's heyday.

buffalofalling
buffalofalling

We've proven for decades that public-private partnerships (ie corporate welfare) doesnt and won't work. Has it had minimal impact, sure. Has it been worth the hundreds of millions given away? Not even close.

Economic development is a waste in this region. You have to invest in human capital... people. Invest education, align the workforce with college programs, etc. That's what builds business and builds the economy.

Doesn't anyone realize how trying to alter the economy by giving away money to business runs against basic economic principles? Put it this way, when a business cant survive or operate in a given economy, it shouldnt be in business.

Continuing to follow this economic model will continue to result what we've seen since 1950...endless decline.

Sure you'll have your pockets of gentrification in the city but the overall condition will remain one of massive neighborhood decline and disinvestment in the majority of the city, a downward regional economy (with a few wins here and there but nothing of significance), and demographic shifts that cripple the region. Its not an opinion, it's a fact.

TheRealBuffaloBill
TheRealBuffaloBill

As much as many on here are no going to like it, the only way to do that is via 'corporate welfare'. The city has told me a couple of places they want me to put my business, so we looked into them and came back and said it was economically impossible for us to put down roots there without allot of money from the city. They have no money for small business however. Then when I see 350k spent to rehab a house, its hard for me to think the 150k we need to rebuild a commercial building, and create 4 full time jobs and another 2 part time would be a better investment. This ends up being the same thing, give business a big grant, 100k or something to come in and set up shop where you want them too and people will be willing to take the risk. I don't know how you would do it otherwise. Small business are like bring in homeowners with a huge vested interest, you'll get allot more bang for your buck.

Buffaboy
Buffaboy

No. They are a private corporation, they control where they want to go. I'm tired of hearing people (politicians) recommending where companies go like that.

longgone
longgone

You're never going to rebuild the buildings that once were. It's sad but true. You can however rebuild the density in the city.

How much money has been spent on cheap housing outside of the core over the last 30 years? How much is going to be spent?

Instead of allowing political allies and pastors create fiefdoms on the plains of the east side and fruit belt, the COB needs to focus those resources. Instead of building duplexes or faux townhomes made of cheap materials, the COB should focus on building much more dense housing on the outskirts of the core. This will create a density that's needed for retail to have a stable market.

The COB should also look at assets like Marine Drive. People are going to downvote this but that property should be sold and those residents moved inward to newly constructed housing. Heck, we all know most of those living there are working the system anyways.

travelman
travelman

Ahh, the Main Place Mall.....don't get me started!

impressingagent
impressingagent

Get ECC to consolidate in larkinville. Let first niagara move into a new downtown building.

HutchTecher
HutchTecher

How do you propose we rebuild what's demolished? Who's paying for artists to hand sculpt 1000 pure gold gargoyles on every structure we rebuild? Pittsburgh is developing a plan to move forward. Instead of learning something, you just want to go back to the way it was. I don't mean to offend you but let it go. Save as much as we can and LET IT GO. Lol new modern buildings have built away from downtown for decades which is why it's a mess. I for one welcome the new and old together ...

What Buffalo lacks is a future master plan!

irishkwh
irishkwh

Its time for Buffalo to Push out the low income properties and entities like the City Mission, HUD, HEAP, Welfare Office, Child Support and the like out of downtown. Want to give the train terminal new life? Take all these agenicies and move them there.

Has anyone ever walked by M&T during the day and see all the dirtbags hanging around. It must be great for M&T and other businesses that are trying to showcase the city but have to deal with the trash that walk around downtown.

How about moving the low-income housing away from the water front? How much in tax reveune does the city lose each year because of this? I bet close to a million and that doesnt include the money spent by tax payers to put this housing up and maint costs.

Dont even get me started on the BMHA!

paulsobo
paulsobo

Pittsburgh actually is a really beautiful city. They have been far more successful in saving their historic neighborhoods and urban buildings than Buffalo.

They were also far earlier in leveraging R&D into the medical sciences to which Buffalo is coming very late and would be foolish not to diversify. Putting all its eggs into medical research so late in the game is well...we have been down this path before.

The only way Buffalo can restore what is once was is to rebuild what it mistakenly demolished. Just the most magnificent pieces that branded our city.

Buffalo is 60% empty there is no reason why new modern buildings cant be built outside our core historical downtown area.

Same with contemporary and modern residential. The eastside and soutside neighboring are empty...it would be stupid to build modern and contemporary there!

What Buffalo lacks is a historical preservation master plan!

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