Christmas Goes Green at Urban Roots too!

It’s that time of year again. Time to consider where you’re going to purchase a Christmas tree from. This year I’m not going to push the idea of choosing a live tree over a cut tree, mainly because of a comment left by Eliz last year when I posted that people do so. Eliz pointed out that there are plenty of environmental benefits no matter which choice you make (as long as you follow through with green disposal methods when purchasing a cut tree)… something that I had never considered at any great length and spouted off without much considering the alternative. Here’s her comment from last holiday season:
“I like Urban Roots a lot and wish them well, but there is a lot to be said for buying a cut tree. Christmas tree farms generate oxygen, help fix carbon in their branches and in the soil and provide habitat for birds and animals. They also help preserve green space. We should support these local businesses. If disposed of properly–left outside to be recycled as compost or mulch–the cut tree continues to provide benefit. I have used lots of city-provided free mulch in my community gardening. Guess where it comes from? Christmas trees. I think living trees are a nice choice for those that prefer them but let’s not go overboard.”
That said, if you do decide that you will be purchasing a live tree, there are great benefits that come along with your decision that include the option of replanting the tree after the holidays are over. “Living trees also improve the air quality of your home and eventually your community,” said Patti Jablonski-Dopkin, General Manager of Urban Roots Community Gardening Center  “They absorb carbon dioxide and produce oxygen as well as mediate air temperature and humidity. When you bring a living tree into your home, you and your family get the benefits of natural air purification. By planting the tree in your yard or an urban neighborhood after Christmas, you give the continued gift of improved air quality to the community.  The trees will also provide habitat for native wildlife species as they grow. Living trees reduce landfill use and methane production.  30-35 million cut Christmas trees are sold in the U.S. each year and approximately 10 million of them end up in landfills, thus producing methane.  When you purchase a living tree, you keep valuable nutrients out of the landfill and cut methane production.”
This year do the right thing. Buy a living tree for all of the right reasons, or purchase a cut tree and make sure that it doesn’t end up in a landfill. If you’re interested in purchasing a living tree from Urban Roots, here is all of the info that you need to know in order to do so…
Urban Roots Community Garden Center offers eight (8) varieties of living, locally-grown evergreens for the holidays.  They are priced in the $60-$75 range and stand 3′-4′ feet tall. The staff can provide you with full planting instructions or will take the tree back and protect it until it can be donated to the community through: Grassroots Gardens, Buffalo Niagara Riverkeeper or the Olmsted Parks.  You choose the recipient of your tree, receive a tax deduction and will be notified of where your tree was planted in the spring. Beyond living Christmas trees, Urban Roots also features locally grown wreaths, garland, holiday greenery, Christmas cactus, cyclamen and amaryllis.  “All of these locally grown items support local job opportunities, particularly needed during in the off-season, and reduce the amount of energy used in transporting them from a long-distant source.” Urban Roots is the nation’s first gardening cooperative and continues to be a foothold in the West Side Renaissance.  Lifetime member-ownerships are available for purchase and gift-giving at a one-time cost of $100.
428 Rhode Island
Buffalo, New York 14213
(716) 362-8982
*Buffalo’s Department of Public Works, Parks & Streets conducts a curbside collection each year as a way to reduce costs associated with taking trees to landfills. 

About the author  ⁄ queenseyes

Founder of Buffalo Rising. Co-founder Elmwood Avenue Festival of the Arts. Co-founder Powder Keg Festival that built the world's largest ice maze (Guinness Book of World Records). Instigator behind Emerald Beach at the Erie Basin Marina. Co-created Flurrious! winter festival. Co-creator of Rusty Chain Beer. Instigator behind Saturday Artisan Market (SAM) at Canalside. Founder of The Peddler retro and vintage market. Instigator behind Liberty Hound @ Canalside. Catalyst behind the Pierce-Arrow Film Arts Center. Throws The Witches Ball at The Hotel @ The Lafayette. Themed New Years mayhem at various locations. Next up: Porchfest... Also offers package tours of the city for groups or individuals. Contact Newell Nussbaumer | Newell@BuffaloRising.com

7 comments
dave majewski
dave majewski

On a recent trip to Mexico, we noticed several vendors actually renting trees. Yes, renting. When you are done with it, you return it and the grower plants it.

eliz
eliz

I don't know how individuals get it. We got a few yards of it to do trees in Allentown.

LouisTully
LouisTully

" I have used lots of city-provided free mulch"

How do you get it?

LouisTully
LouisTully

You gotta be kidding. Such a prolific basher of all things you deem inferior and you come on here bashing meat eaters. And, like eliz states, what good would it be for tree farmers if their business model was based on carnage?

I'm gonna eat the shit out of some dead animals Thursday. It's gonna be awesome.

eliz
eliz

The trees take much more than 3 years--10 is more like it. So plenty of habitat for small birds. And there is continual replanting. It's not like a field of trees is suddenly cut to the ground. Tree farming does not work that way. There is plenty of information available on this--lots of studies.

That said, a potted tree is a nice choice for many people. We don't have to condemn one to prefer the other.

ladyinwhite
ladyinwhite

Cut tree's like the Thanksgiving turkey is factory farming at it's worst. So much destruction and carnage. Go for a potted tree and a nice roast root veggie meal with tofurkey. You'll feel better about yourself.

jag
jag

"help fix carbon in their branches and in the soil and provide habitat for birds and animals."

Huh? Is this true? I thought the sequestered carbon dioxide (assuming that's what the commenter is talking about) is just released back into the atmosphere once the tree is cut/begins decomposition. And obviously "provid[ing] habitat for birds and animals" barely makes sense. The trees take, what, 3 years to grow? Disturbing what little nesting (if there is in fact any) occurs in these "farms" on a yearly basis is hardly something to be proud of.

That said, yes, recycle your tree if you purchase it cut. I don't think there's anyone who doesn't do so these days.

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