UB Biosciences Incubator Welcomes First Companies

The University at Buffalo Biosciences Incubator has selected its first tenants: AccuTheranostics, AndroBioSys and Ceno Technologies, three companies that will benefit from the facility’s location at UB’s Clinical and Translational Research Center on the Buffalo Niagara Medical Campus (BNMC).
AccuTheranostics, previously based in the UB Technology Incubator at Baird Research Park in Amherst, is dedicated to helping cancer patients personalize chemotherapy treatment to achieve the best possible results.
AndroBioSys, the brainchild of two Roswell Park Cancer Institute researchers, is developing novel ways to detect, image and treat early prostate cancer.
And Ceno Technologies, a materials science company, is moving its biological sciences division to the incubator, where Ceno researchers will study and develop nanoparticles for delivering drugs.
Executives at all three firms cite the UB Biosciences Incubator’s proximity to potential research and clinical partners as a key benefit.
“We are on the medical campus now, which means we will have better and easier communication with the Roswell staff,” said Sherry Bradford, founding president of AccuTheranostics, which relocated to the incubator this August.
The 4,000-square-foot incubator houses offices and state-of-the-art wet labs on the fifth floor of the Clinical and Translational Research Center (CTRC)/Gates Vascular Institute. The 10-story building, which UB and Kaleida Health and UB jointly opened earlier this year, is at the corner of Goodrich and Ellicott Street in Buffalo.
The incubator is run by UB’s Office of Science, Technology Transfer and Economic Outreach (STOR). Clients pay to rent space, but receive free access to services such as specialized equipment; seminars on entrepreneurship; guidance on business needs such as marketing; and assistance applying for grants and seeking investment capital.
These resources are particularly helpful for life science entrepreneurs — like Bradford — who come from research backgrounds and have limited experience in the business world.
“STOR facilitates the transfer of UB discoveries into enterprises that create value and provide products and services that benefit the public good,” said UB Associate Vice Provost Woody Maggard, who oversees STOR’s incubator program. “One of the key ways we do this is through incubating new companies, just as we have at the Baird Research Park since 1988. The UB Biosciences Incubator will extend this effort by collaborating with the CTRC to bring additional UB discoveries to market.”

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AccuTheranostics
AccuTheranostics is dedicated to helping doctors identify which chemotherapy treatments will likely work on a patient’s tumor — and which likely won’t.
To achieve this goal, the company tests different chemotherapy combinations on cells biopsied from patients’ tumors. These tests reveal which mixtures of drugs are likely to be effective in combatting each individual’s unique cancer, said Sherry Bradford, PhD, the firm’s founding president.
So far, AccuTheranostics has screened hundreds of tumors. The firm’s ChemoFit test has been 98 percent accurate in identifying resistant drugs and 97 percent accurate in identifying effective drugs, Bradford said.
AndroBioSys
AndroBioSys specializes in advanced detection, diagnostic imaging and therapeutics for early prostate cancer. One of the company’s major goals is to develop techniques that will enable doctors to target drugs and imaging agents specifically to the prostate, while limiting the exposure of these chemicals in other parts of the body.
The company’s founders are Gary J. Smith and James L. Mohler, both researchers at Roswell Park Cancer Institute. Smith, PhD, is a member of Roswell’s prostate program and a member of the institute’s urology department. Mohler, MD, another prostate cancer expert, chairs Roswell’s urology department and serves as Roswell’s senior vice president for translational research. Mohler is also a professor of urology at UB.
Smith said AndroBioSys is working to address one of the most important issues in prostate cancer treatment today: the need to give doctors better tools for predicting which prostate tumors will threaten patients’ lives.
Ceno Technologies
Ceno Technologies is a global leader in developing high-quality advanced particle technologies. The firm’s scientists develop novel materials for use by the automotive, manufacturing, military, pharmaceutical and other industries.
While Ceno Technologies formed in 2007 with a focus on materials science, the company quickly branched out into biomedical research, investigating the use of small particles to deliver drugs and support photodynamic therapy for an array of diseases.
The firm is based at the Innovation Center on the Buffalo Niagara Medical Campus, but will move its Bio Division to the UB Biosciences Incubator.

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19 comments
Old First Ward
Old First Ward

Does anyone know why the north facade of this building appears to have a white spray coating all over the entire side leaving only small slits in the horizontal rows of windows? I assumed it had something to do with a sunlight reflector but I'm not sure. Either way it looks horrible.

whatever
whatever

There, finally that time:

rand>"If you are talking about job growth in general, there may be issues of taxes and spending."

So you are capable of, um - let's say innovating - a reply which acknowledges other people's points instead of just talking past and down to them. A reply like that could have just been your first to pfk or me.

Nice framing using 'If' for something I clearly had said I meant, so there's no real 'if' about it, but still a big step forward.

Yay! :-)

whatever
whatever

rand - that's two consecutive replies of yours (to pfk67, then to me), three if we count your double post, in which you've been condescending even while it's *you* who's apparently misinterpreting comments to which you're replying.

rand>"You seriously think that the presence or lack of unions has anything to do with tech or biotech startups? Seriously?"

That and your long rant following it seems to pretend the first sentence of my Oct 26 comment isn't there, so I'll repeat it:

"pfk's point was about state-level policies, not local/regional, and looks more general about businesses here rather than only about innovation."

And the remainder of my comment was clear that it wasn't narrowly focused on 'innovation' types of businesses/jobs such as biotech startups.

In fact, that was the whole point. Previous comments from pfk and flyguy look more general too.

Rand503
Rand503

If you are talking about job growth in general, there may be issues of taxes and spending. (Although one will note that Texas's job rate growth has been due to extensive amounts of federal funding over the past few years).

Anyway, those are separate isssues. I'm only talking about innovation, which is my field of expertise.

Rand503
Rand503

When it comes to innovation, unions, taxing and spending are indeed irrelevant. You seriously think that the presence or lack of unions has anything to do with tech or biotech startups? Seriously?

Startups have no revenue. They often have no revenue for years. With biotech companies, it can be many years before they get FDA approval to sell anything at all. Therefore, tax rates are irrelevant.

And what has gov't spending got to do with any of this?

The fact that you would even mention that shows me that you know nothing about how companies are started in the innovation sector and that you are merely using Fox News talking points to promote an agenda that has nothing to do with innovation.

First, if they were relevant, then the entire states of Texas would be a hot bed of innovation. It is only in Austin, and a little bit in San antonio, that has any real innovation going on.

Second, Massachusetts and Maryland are leaders in the biotech industry, even though they have unions, taxes and spending. Why? Because Boston has a cluster of leading univerisities, and Maryland has good universities plus NIH and other gov't health agencies.

Third, if you look at the places where they have the highest ratio of spin off innovative companies, they are actually Miami, FL, Salt Lake City, Utah, and Madison, WI. Why? Because they happen to have one person in charge who knows how to move scientific advances into actual companies.

The real reason a city is innovative is in those places because there is usually one person who knows how to commercialize the technology that is coming out of the university and does it very well. They work together with the researchers at an early stage and devise ways of turning an idea into an actual business. Once you've done it about 50 times, you get to really know how it works, and you learn who all the players are. Those people are invaluable, and there are only a few in the country who are really good at it.

Beyond that, the major centers of innovation remain Silicon Valley, Austin, and Boston. The place with the greatest number of startups in the US? Washington DC. Why? Because so many of them are spinoffs or depdendant upon government.

So, first, there is no correlation between unions/taxes and spending and whether a region is innovative or not. Second, you haven't explained how unions, taxes or spending have any bearing upon, and third, you completely ignore the real factors of how innovation gets off the ground. Hint: the real factors are whether you have an innovation ecosystem in place, which means that you have the technology that in unique that comes from R&D, a university or elsewhere, people that know how to take the idea and turn it into a viable business, adequate funding sources such as angel investors and venture capitalists who can identify the best new companies and actually fund them, and finally the knowhow to scale the company globally.

We've seen innovation ecosystems spring up in the unlikeliest of places, and it can be done anywhere. It doesn't take a lot of money or huge teck parks, and it doesn't matter about the taxes or the gov't policies.

whatever
whatever

rand -

pfk's point was about state-level policies, not local/regional, and looks more general about businesses here rather than only about innovation. Those concepts sometimes overlap and sometimes don't. Innovation can grow businesses that end up locating jobs in somewhere different.

While Austin being socially liberal is a big plus to some, as you also noted it's in a state which for fiscal policies (taxing/spending, union power, etc) is one of the least left-leaning in the nation.

Metro areas of all types of social leanings in Texas have had a lot of growth in jobs and businesses.

No doubt there are also some counter examples of places having strong business growth in states that are fiscally left-leaning, but Austin isn't one.

You claim there's a 'nil' amount of innovation in 'Alabama, Louisiana, Georgia, Tennessee'.

Even if you're correct about that, more to the point of pkf's comment the BLS website says every one of those four states has had much higher rates of long term jobs growth/retention (since 1990, earliest data they show) compared to some Upstate NY metros like Buffalo which hasn't had any real growth in the same decades.

Of course, state policies on taxing-spending-unions-etc aren't the only factors in that. But they aren't irrelevant either.

Rand503
Rand503

Baloney. Success has nothing to do with whether a region is "liberal" or "conservative." Austin, Texas is a very liberal in a very conservative state, and it is one of the top three innovative centers in the US. Silicon Valley got started in the 70s in CA, just south of liberal SF.

Meanwhile, you can't find more conservative states than Alabama, Louisiana, Georgia, Tennessee. The amount of innovation coming out of there is nil. So if you want to turn this into a rant against liberal policies, the facts are simply against you.

Rand503
Rand503

Baloney. Success has nothing to do with whether a region is "liberal" or "conservative." Austin, Texas is a very liberal in a very conservative state, and it is one of the top three innovative centers in the US. Silicon Valley got started in the 70s in CA, just south of liberal SF.

Meanwhile, you can't find more conservative states than Alabama, Louisiana, Georgia, Tennessee. The amount of innovation coming out of there is nil. So if you want to turn this into a rant against liberal policies, the facts are simply against you.

Rand503
Rand503

Absolutely correct. Innovation is dependent upon serial entrepreneurs, and there simply are not many in Buffalo. A serial entreprenuer is someone who has started and successfully exited a company at least three times, but really five times. If you have done that, then you now everything about how to start a business, and probably had at least one failure there too. You've had everything that can possibly be thrown against you.

Any company that wants to play must understand that there is only one global market. You cannot pretend that you are targeting only the US market, or the EU market. It is a global economy, and you need people who can scale up the company quickly to global competition. There just aren't that many people who can do that in Buffalo. We need to create more of them, and there are a variety of ways.

Rand503
Rand503

This is true. It really doesn't matter whether innovation comes from the burbs or the city. It benefits the whole region, and we should support innovation whereever it occurs, and it benefits us all.

Having said that, though, innovation occurs best in dense clusters for a variety of reasons.

So although I don't think the town vs. burbs argument is a productive one, we should nonetheless encourage the greatest efficiencies, as that benefits every one in the best possible way.

whatever
whatever

pfk>"It will always suffer until the state returns to its conservative roots. Which won't be in my life."

There's a good chance the state won't ever become much less left leaning than it is now compared to other states, or at least not during lifetimes of anyone alive today. That's just how it is for better or worse, something to be expected.

However keeping it in perspective, it isn't as though no businesses can succeed here. This metro's total number of jobs is fairly steady over the past 10 or 20 years, in a range usually between 520,000 and 560,000 with some ups/downs. Granted, no long term growth like the national economy has or most metros do, but still it's been pretty steady in that way.

Buffalogni
Buffalogni

Great story! Buffalo needs more companies and jobs.

pfk67
pfk67

Althought I agree with flyguy that moving more businesses into Buffalo will benefit the city...at least downtown, I also think the big picture is city vs state is a bigger issue and state vs state is even bigger.

In my mind, Buffalo is trapped. It is in a hopelessly liberal state, but unlike NYC, it is broke. NY as a state is totally uncompetitive with the rest of the country. Take Wall Street out of NYC and the state goes...broke. Simple as that.

I love Buffalo almost to a fault. It will always suffer until the state returns to its conservative roots. Which won't be in my life.

LouisTully
LouisTully

That's true. Exactly why the whole IDA structure in this county is a joke. But the suburban IDAs don't see it that way.

schvanstuchen
schvanstuchen

Couldn't agree more. Any large city is judged from it's CBD not it suburbs. We need to have a thriving and vibrant downtown to attract attention to our region. The more people we have working AND living downtown the better our entire metropolitan area looks.

Travelrrr
Travelrrr

That is where you are wrong. WNY will not be on sound footing, and effectively able to compete, until the WNY gets back to its core and stops sprawl (which drains resources, is expensive, hurts the environment, etc.) Sprawl certainly is not unique to Buffalo, but a hollowed-out core is (along with a select number of cities, such as Detroit, etc.)

The other subtext here is that Buffalo needs entrepreneurs, not scientists, running companies. It needs professionals with track records of growing, selling businesses; these are in whom investors will believe and to whom they will provide financial support.

Top-down business development (from the state, city and/or educational institutions) rarely works, and is often grossly inefficient. STOR has been around for 30 years--how many successful companies has it churned out?

Don't get me wrong--I am thrilled they are moving in to the core, and hope that this churns out some real success stories.

hamp
hamp

The big picture is that healthy cities and regions need to have a strong center for the good of the entire region. Subsidizing suburban sprawl through policies that encourage new roads and subdivisions don't help and aren't sustainable.

Other cities are beating us because they "get it". They are investing in their cities with new mass transit, parks and housing.

flyguy
flyguy

The city versus suburb thing has to stop. The real competition is far off cities, states, and countries and while the WNY population continues its drain, they benefit. This is a regional issue and the region ought to work together to fix, not to squabble internally and pit city vs suburb. There are too many layers of overlapping interests competing against one another on a local level, blind to the bigger picture.

Cam33r4
Cam33r4

Even if it's not many people, just getting more workers out of Amherst and into Buffalo is great news.

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