Enjoy A Real Green Christmas

If you’re planning on heading out and getting a Christmas tree this holiday season, please leave the axe at home. Urban Roots is teaming up with Riverkeeper, Grassroots Gardens and Olmsted Parks to, once again, offer up an alternative that can help your home, the city and our planet. Why not consider investing in a living tree? “Living trees improve the air quality of your home,” says Patti Jablonski-Dopkin, General Manager of Urban Roots Community Gardening Center. “And eventually your community.  They absorb carbon dioxide and produce oxygen as well as mediate air temperature and humidity. When you bring a living tree into your home, you and your family get the benefits of natural air purification. By planting the tree in your yard or an urban neighborhood after Christmas, you give the continued gift of improved air quality to the community.  The trees will also provide habitat for native wildlife species as they grow. Living trees reduce landfill use and methane production.  30-35 million cut Christmas trees are sold in the U.S. each year and approximately 10 million of them end up in landfills, thus producing methane.  When you purchase a living tree, you keep valuable nutrients out of the landfill and cut methane production.”

If you’re not sure what to do with the tree once the holidays are over, bring it back to Urban Roots and they will take care of it until spring. Then they will give your tree to one of the partnering groups to get it planted (you can even get a write off). Additionally, since you did such a good deed, you can go and visit your tree whenever you want! Then you can buy a friend for your tree next season, and the season after that. After all, we were once known as the City of Trees.
Urban Roots Community Garden Center, located at 428 Rhode Island Street, offers eight (8) varieties of living, locally-grown evergreens for the holidays.  They are priced in the $60-$70 range and stand 3′-4′ feet tall. The staff can provide you with full planting instructions. 

About the author  ⁄ arenn

7 comments
Crisa
Crisa

As far as Urban Roots is concerned, I don't have an opinion except that bringing a live, needled "Christmas" tree into the house caused allergic reactions at our house. That never happens when the trees are growing outside.

Because of that allergic reaction, we have an artificial tree and, after MANY years of wasting money, I finally found a plug-in at Bath & Body Works that to us IS the real thing! The BALSAM scent does it for us! Our ENTIRE house smells like Christmas for a long, long time!

Besides wreaths from some supermarkets that are already quite dead and fall apart in the car on the way home, supermarkets and other retail stores will be selling teeny-tiny evergreen seedlings in nasty, too-small containers soon. That's cruelty to evergreens. Seedlings are in their first year and are babies. Therefore, especially in the dormancy of wintertime, they need to be outside spreading their root systems in order to live. Older trees probably fare better over an indoor winter if they are older than newborns.

Meanwhile, our tree is up, our house smells like Christmas, and so I would like to take this occasion to wish everyone a HAPPY THANKSGIVING!

crisa.11_7_11@yahoo.com

sbrof
sbrof

ahh, rent-a-tree I could be down with that.

LouisTully
LouisTully

I'd possibly consider this except one bad experience at Urban Roots has burnt me forever.

jag
jag

"If you're not sure what to do with the tree once the holidays are over, bring it back to Urban Roots and they will take care of it until spring. Then they will give your tree to one of the partnering groups to get it planted (you can even get a write off)."

sbrof
sbrof

I agree with Eliz, It is true that a living tree is better for your indoor air quality but at the same time, I don't have land to plant one tree every year, forever.. I live in the city... Maybe one would work.

Providing a living and sustainability to the farming and tree industry is probably WAY more important to the environment than buying a live tree for your house. These are the families who may or may not sell to become the next subdivision. Keeping them profitable is the best way to avoid them selling off their land and keeping it green.

Don't forget that many people reuse their trees either for wood, covering their garden beds, mulch. I am usually for these kinds of things but getting people to recycle their paper and plastics would, on weekly basis, likely prevent more waste and methane from being produced in one week compared to a years worth of Christmas trees.

Hobo Joe
Hobo Joe

This is a great example of why people hate on uber-liberals.

Just ignore Eliz's comments which tell the other side which is far more important to the economy and environment, unless of course you own a piece of Urban Roots.

eliz
eliz

I like Urban Roots a lot and wish them well, but there is a lot to be said for buying a cut tree. Christmas tree farms generate oxygen, help fix carbon in their branches and in the soil and provide habitat for birds and animals. They also help preserve green space. We should support these local businesses.

If disposed of properly--left outside to be recycled as compost or mulch--the cut tree continues to provide benefit. I have used lots of city-provided free mulch in my community gardening. Guess where it comes from? Christmas trees.

I think living trees are a nice choice for those that prefer them but let's not go overboard.

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